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Is BDD Testing? A model for testers

Is BDD testing? No. Well, some of the activities involve Testers, but it’s not REAL testing, right? Look! It’s complicated! Yes, yes! I know it’s yet ANOTHER post on BDD, but we need to talk about this and I’m not here to criticise I’m here to understand so please bear with me! An Introduction Sarcasm aside, Behaviour Driven Development is a big deal within software development and opinions on it are polarised. BDD started to gain traction just as I started contracting as an Automation specialist so I have a…

Say TaTTa to your TuTTu: Liverpool tester gathering

Over the summer I gave a new talk called ‘Say TaTTa to your TuTTu’ at Liverpool tester gathering which expands upon my previous blog post Anti-pattern: Cross browser checking The talk was recorded and you can view it below, and sorry about the weird cable in the middle of the video! Once again a big thank you Liverpool tester gathering for putting me on and if you live in the North West area I encourage you to head to their next session as they have some great speakers and regular…

Postman – Parsing HTML responses

I recently did a blog post on sharing and comparing values in XML and JSON payloads after getting some questions around the topic. Another common question I get in my training sessions that are similar to parsing payloads is around parsing HTML so that you can store values or assert on them for checking purposes, so again I thought I would share my solution on how you can parse an HTML response. The problem Let’s say we have a web page like the one below that we are running checks…

Postman – Sharing payloads across requests

As part of my workshops, I offer support afterwards to help answer questions attendees have once they are back at work and applying what they’ve learnt in the real world. I was asked a question recently about Postman around sharing and comparing payloads across requests. It’s a question that has popped up a few times, so I thought I would share my solutions towards how you can get Postman to store payloads and then retrieve them to use as a comparator in later requests. The problem For this example, I…

Anti-pattern: Cross browser checking

Recently I was reading a discussion on the Testing community’s automation slack channel in which one of the members was asking others about options around extending their smoke checks to run against multiple browsers. The others gave great advice around using tools such as Sauce labs or Virtual machines which are perfectly valid, but unknowingly they fell into a trap. They were demonstrating what I believe is an important anti-pattern when it comes to checking which I want to discuss today. What is this anti-pattern and why is it an…

How to build an automated API test framework – Part 3

So here we are. The final post on building an automated API framework. We’ve covered a lot of ground already so if you if you haven’t already I would recommend reading the first post on creating a framework with basic checks followed by the second post on extending the framework to handle POST requests. If you are all caught up then let’s continue… Before we start let’s take a look at what we have so far: spec stores our automated checks api a library of API endpoints we use in…

How to build an automated API test framework – Part 2

In the previous post on creating an automated api framework we created a framework and a series of automated checks that will run some basic GET request checks against restful-booker. If you haven’t gone through the previous post I would recommend you do so before you continue. …Welcome back! So let’s recap on what we’ve created so far: spec stores our automated checks api a library of API endpoints we use in spec to communication with restful-booker gemfile / Rakefile manages the running of our framework and it’s dependencies We…

How to build an automated API test framework – Part 1

For a while now I’ve wanted to do a series of posts on how to build an automated API / web service / integration testing framework and especially how to build one in a robust way.  There is a lot to go over so I plan to break this series up into three posts to focus on specific areas of the framework and in this one we’ll focus on getting the framework up and running with a handful of automated checks. These posts assume you have some working knowledge of how HTTP works. The…

Testing lessons learnt: Anything build party & TestLab @ AgileTD 2015

Day 1 I had such big plans for Agile Testing Days. I was going to attend various talks and workshops. I was going to participate and learn. I was going only going to drop by quickly and say hello to James Lyndsay and Bart Knaack at the Anything Build Party & TestLab, see what they were doing, and then be on my way. Then James demonstrated to me how to use a Particle Internet button with wifi enabled powered adaptors, invited me to give it a go and that was…

Unexpected Automation: Creating a randomised HTTP payload

After a bit of a break for the summer holiday, and as promised in Quickly creating test data in MongoDB, here is a look at how we can use the randomisation script script from Quickly creating test data in MongoDB to create a randomised HTTP payload for POST requests. However, before we begin, let’s refresh ourselves with the randomisation script: var name = [“Mark”,”Mary”,”Sally”,”Jim”,”Eric”,”Susan”] var surname = [“Jones”,”Wilson”,”Jackson”,”Brown”,”Smith”,”Ericsson”] var randomiseNumber = function(from, to){ return Math.floor(Math.random() * (to – from + 1)) + from; } var randomiseDate = function(start, end) {…